Ohio Communities to Benefit from Millions in USDA-Funded Water, Wastewater Infrastructure Improvements

Name
Heather Hartley
Phone
City
COLUMBUS
Release Date
May 29, 2020

U.S. Department of Agriculture Ohio Rural Development State Director David L. Hall recently announced four rural Ohio communities are among more than a hundred that will receive $9.2 million in water and wastewater infrastructure funding through USDA’s Water and Waste Disposal Loan and Grant program.

   “At USDA, we understand that access to safe, clean drinking water and effective wastewater treatment provides a bedrock foundation on which rural communities can thrive,” said Hall. “Not only is a robust water system necessary for health and well-being, it’s also what entices business and industry to invest in Ohio’s rural areas. We’re proud to partner with local governments and non-profit associations to improve quality of life and economic viability for rural Ohioans.”

In Ohio:

  • Lucasville-based (Scioto County) Regional Water District #1 will use its combined $5.5 million loan and grant to offset costs associated with replacing the filtering system for the water treatment plant. First established in 1967, the plant generates more than a billion gallons of safe, potable water each year from nine wells supplied by the ancient Teays Valley Aquifer. "Water 1" provides water to more than 6,000 connections in eight Scioto County townships, along with bulk water sales to five other entities and communities.
  • Woodsfield (Monroe County) will use its combined $100,000 loan and grant to complete upgrades to its water treatment and distribution system. The current system is obsolete and inefficient, with leaks that threaten environmental sustainability and thwart water pressure.
  • Dresden (Muskingum County) will use its combined $1.25 million loan and grant to construct and complete its new wastewater treatment plant. Dresden is under “Findings and Orders” from the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency; now required by law to update its half-century old, failing plant. The $1.25 million supplements a $3,737,000 loan and grant combination obligated in 2017.
  • Oak Harbor (Ottawa County) will use this additional $2,392,000 loan and grant combination to replace 140-year-old wastewater collection lines in the Church Street area. The construction of a modern wastewater collection system will allow the older, existing lines to be used exclusively for stormwater control. In addition to upgrading wastewater collection, water lines will be replaced, adding capacity and improving access to safe, clean drinking water for village residents.

In addition to Ohio, USDA is funding projects in Alabama, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Georgia, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Mississippi, Montana, Nebraska, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Puerto Rico, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin and Wyoming.

Eligible applicants include rural cities, towns and water districts. The funds can be used for drinking water, stormwater drainage and waste disposal systems in rural communities that meet population limits. 

For application or eligibility information, view the interactive RD Apply tool or contact one of USDA Rural Development’s state or field offices.

USDA Rural Development provides loans and grants to help expand economic opportunities and create jobs in rural areas. This assistance supports infrastructure improvements; business development; housing; community facilities such as schools, public safety and health care; and high-speed internet access in rural areas. For more information, visit www.rd.usda.gov.

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